LOVE OF GOD.

2/14/17 Devotional

Romans 5:8,9

8 But God proves His love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us. 9 Therefore, since we have now been justified by His blood, how much more shall we be saved from wrath through Him!

“Could we with ink the ocean fill and were the skies of parchment made, Were every stalk on earth a quill and every man a scribe by trade, To write the love of God above would drain the ocean dry.”

The description of God’s love.

As we celebrate a day of Love I am compelled to write just a few thoughts on the Love of God. A subject that I could write on for ages to come and never scratch the surface.

Several years ago, a student in a theology class I was taking stood to his feet and announced to the professor, “I don’t believe in God!” The professor, unfazed, replied, “Describe this God you don’t believe in?” After the student had described an unlovely and vengeful God, the professor confessed, “I don’t believe in that God either. My God is a God of love.”

How would you describe a flower to a blindman? How would you describe the Beatles Abbey Road album to a deaf person?  How do you describe the thrill of ice-skating to a paraplegic? How do we describe the boundless, perfect love of God to broken, finite persons?

The most vivid attribute of God is His love. Frederick M. Lehman, author and composer, wrote a hymn entitled, The Love of God. Read and meditate onto lyrics.

The love of God is greater far than tongue or pen can ever tell;

It goes beyond the highest star, and reaches to the lowest hell ;

The guilty pair, bowed down with care, God gave His only Son to win;

His erring child He reconciled; you and I pardoned from his sin.

O love of God, how rich and pure, it shall forevermore endure.

How measureless and strong, the saint’s and angel’s song we sing,

“Holy! Holy!”

When age and time shall pass away and earthly thrones and kingdoms fall,

When men here refuse to pray, and rocks and hills and mountains call,

God’s love so sure, will still endure, all measureless and strong;

Redeeming grace to Adam”s race shall be the saint’s and angel’s song.

Could we with ink the ocean fill and were the skies of parchment made,

Were every stalk on earth a quill and every man a scribe by trade,

To write the love of God above would drain the ocean dry.

Nor could the scroll contain the whole, though stretched from sky to sky.

O love of God, how rich and pure, it shall forevermore endure.

How measureless and strong, the saint’s and angel’s song we sing,

“Holy! Holy!””

The beloved hymn The Love of God had its roots in a long Jewish poem written in the eleventh century in Germany.

       The Jewish poem, Hadamut, in the Aramaic language, has ninety couplets. The poem itself is in the form of an acrostic. It was composed, in the year 1096, by Rabbi Mayer, son of Isaac Nehorai, who was a cantor in the city of Worms, Germany.

Throughout the poem, the theme of God’s eternal love and concern for His people is evident. One section of this poem, from which the present third stanza of The Love of God was evidently adapted, reads as follows:

Were the sky of parchment made,

A quill each reed, each twig and blade,

Could we with ink the oceans fill,

Were every man a scribe of skill,

The marvelous story, Of God’s great glory

Would still remain untold; For He, most high

The earth and sky Created alone of old.

Through one hymn the roots of our Christian history are explored in a Jewish poem of wonderment of the love of God. Throughout the hymn the composer begs the question, “Will we ever fully know the love of God?” My question today, “Are we still captured in reverent wonder of the  LOVE of God?” Thank and praise him daily for a love that never fails, for a love that is ever expanding, for a love that is matchless.